Visiting Scholars

Vincent Ialenti

Vincent Ialenti

Cornell University, United States

(January 2017-December 2021)

 Vincent Ialenti is a MacArthur Postdoctoral Fellow at ISTP, and an anthropologist who studies nuclear waste expert cultures. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from Cornell University and an MSc in Law, Anthropology & Society from the London School of Economics. He is currently developing an interview-based study of lessons learned from the 2014 radiological accident at the WIPP defense waste repository in New Mexico. Vincent’s first ethnographic project explored how safety assessment experts working on Finland’s nuclear energy waste repository project at Olkiluoto grappled with deep time, death, succession, and the limits of human imagination. He has been a U.S. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow (2011-2016) and a Mellon Fellow at Cornell’s Society for the Humanities (2015-2016). Alongside his academic publications, Vincent has written articles for NPR, Forbes, Physics Today, and Nautilus.

 

Togzhan Kassenova, Kazakhstan

Togzhan Kassenova, Kazakhstan

Non-Resident Visiting Scholar

Dr. Togzhan Kassenova currently works on issues related to proliferation financing controls, exploring ways to minimize access of proliferators to the global financial system. She also conducts research on Brazil’s nuclear policy. In addition, Dr. Kassenova, a native of Kazakhstan, is writing a comprehensive nuclear history of her country. The upcoming book covers forty years of Soviet nuclear testing and health and environmental damage they inflicted, and the pivotal decisions Kazakhstan took on the fate of more than a thousand Soviet nuclear weapons left on its territory after the Soviet collapse.

 

Her professional experience includes policy research positions at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Center for International Trade and Security of the University of Georgia, and James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, as well as teaching positions at KIMEP University (Kazakhstan) and Middlebury Institute of International Studies (Monterey, CA).

Dr. Kassenova is the author of From Antagonism to Partnership: The Uneasy Path of the U.S.-Russian Cooperative Threat Reduction (2007) and Brazil’s Nuclear Kaleidoscope: An Evolving Identity (2014). Her latest publications include “Challenges With Implementing Proliferation Financing Controls: How Export Controls Can Help,” “Banning Nuclear Testing: Lessons From the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site,” and “Brazil, Argentina, and the Politics of Global Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safeguards.”

 

From 2011 to 2015 Kassenova served on the UN secretary general’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters.

Lindsay Krall

Lindsay Krall

Stockholm University, Sweden

(January 2017-December 2018)

Lindsay Krall is a post-doctoral MacArthur fellow in Nuclear Security Issues with a broad interest in the sustainable implementation of nuclear energy. She has received a B.S.E. in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in Geological Science from Stockholm University. Her doctoral research, which involved tracing the redox history and mobility of natural uranium in fractured granitic bedrock using uranium and thorium series isotopes, was jointly supported by the Marie Curie Initial Training Network, MetTrans and the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, by whom she was employed.

Ann Meceda

Ann Meceda

Senior Non-Resident Scholar, U.S. Department of State Washington, D.C.

Ann Meceda is a Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. Department of State. She currently serves as Coordinator for International Cyber Policy, Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs. Ann most recently served as the IISTP State Department Visiting Scholar. Prior to the George Washington University. She served as the U.S. Head of Delegation to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council and on Arctic policy issues in the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.  Ann has previously served in Morocco, Germany, Slovakia, and Tunisia.  Prior to joining the State Department, she worked in business development and financial strategy for venture-backed technology and media firms in Silicon Valley and abroad.

Dan Metlay

Dan Metlay

Non-Resident Visiting Scholar

Dr. Daniel Metlay is now an independent researcher who is working on a book dealing with the institutional and technical challenges of developing a deep‐mined, geologic repository for high‐activity radioactive waste. He recently retired after 24‐years of service on the senior professional staff of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. Prior to joining the NWTRB, Dr. Metlay taught organizational theory and public policy in the political science departments of Indiana University, Bloomington, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a Research Scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, investigating operational and organizational issues at nuclear power plants. 

Matan Meyer

Matan Meyer

U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C.

(July 2018-July 2019) Matan Meyer is a Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. Department of State. He most recently served as the Political and Economic Chief at the U.S. Consulate General in Peshawar, Pakistan.  Matan has previously served overseas in Islamabad and Shanghai.  He has also served two tours in Washington, DC focusing on Asia policy.  Prior to joining the State Department, he was a U.S. Air Force Special Operations pilot.

Aiden Warren

Visiting Fulbright Scholar, Australia

Associate Professor Aiden Warren is the 2018-19 Fulbright Scholar in Australia-United States Alliance Studies, sponsored by the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade (DFAT).

Associate Professor Warren’s teaching and research interests are in the areas of International Security, US national security and foreign policy, US Politics (ideas, institutions, contemporary and historical), International Relations (especially great power politics), and issues associated with Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) proliferation, non-proliferation and arms control. He is the sole author of The Obama Administration’s Nuclear Weapon Strategy: The Promises of Prague and Prevention, Pre-emption and the Nuclear Option: From Bush to Obama; and co-author of Governing the Use-Of-Force in International Relations: The post 9/11 US Challenge on International Law, Presidential Doctrines, and Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Search for Global Security.

Associate Professor Warren is Editor of Rethinking Humanitarian Intervention in the 21st Century (Edinburgh University Press), and is also the Series Editor of the Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) book series with Rowman and Littlefield, New York, NY.

As the Fulbright Scholar in Australia-U.S. Alliance Studies, based at the Arms Control Association in Washington D.C., Associate Professor Warren’s project examines the tensions between U.S. nuclear force modernization and the global non-proliferation regime. The 2018 Nuclear Posture Review, compounded with U.S. President Donald Trump’s apparent disdain for arms control treaties, has the potential to negatively impact the positive role that the United States can and must play in moving toward a ‘world without nuclear weapons’ and sustaining the (Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty) NPT.